Category Archives: Timecapsule Thursday

Timecapsule Thursday: Irv’s Grill at Shaw and Vandeventer 1949-1999

I’d love to hear your memories of this place – it sounds so fun!

https://shawstlarchives.wordpress.com/2016/08/18/irvs-grill-at-shaw-and-vandenventer-1949-1999/


Timecapsule Thursday: Mary McRee obit

Mary McRee obit

21 Oct 1889 St Louis Post Dispatch via newspapers.com


Timecapsule Thursday: 1903 School for the Blind

Blind School 1903


Timecapsule Thursday: Mother/Son reunion, 1946

Mrs. Mary Patterson hugging her son George, whom she hadn’t seen for 7 years.  They had been separated in Scotland when he couldn’t secure passage to America after the outbreak of war.

Shaw reunion 1946


Timecapsule Thursday: Rossman School

Came across an article on another Shaw resident, Mary Rossman, founder of the Rossman School. (an independent, coeducational preparatory school for students in Junior Kindergarten (age 4) through Grade 6, located in Creve Coeur)

Rossman school 6 Dec 1967

P-D archives, 6 Dec 1967

Mary Rossman school founders

Mary Rossman and Helen Schwaner, image courtesy of Rossman School


Timecapsule Thursday: Red Kate

This article originally ran in the January 2005 issue of the Shaw Neighborhood Newsletter.  Photo attributions are updated.

Red Kate Kindles Shaw

By Cara Jensen

I believe there might be an extra spark in the Shaw air to inspire people into activism.  How poignant that we have a notorious example in our past – socialist activist Kate Richards O’Hare resided at 3955 Castleman from 1913 to 1917.

 

Touted as the most radical public figure in pre-World War I St. Louis, “Red Kate” spoke for victims of oppression, especially poor working women, and against entrenched economic and political interests.  She worked tirelessly with local progressives for social change, but unlike most middle-class women she did cast her reform agenda in pa

rtisan terms.  O’Hare was a socialist and editor of the National Rip-Saw, a socialist monthly published in St. Louis.

 

 

In 1910, Kate O’Hare ran for a congressional seat on the Socialist ballot, and in 1913 she represented the party at the Second International in London. In 1917, as chair of the party’s Committee on War and Militarism, she spoke coast-to-coast against U.S. entry into World War I.  She was indicted under the Federal Espionage Act and imprisoned in the Missouri State Penitentiary with fellow activist Emma Goldman. In 1920, as the culmination of a nationwide campaign by socialists and civil libertarians, her sentence was commuted; she later received a full pardon from President Calvin Coolidge.

O’Hare’s distress over conditions for female prisoners sparked a life-long crusade for penal reform.  After leaving St. Louis, she became assistant director of the California Department of Penology where she implemented prison reform at San Quentin.  Kate O’Hare was also active in Upton Sinclair’s 1934 “End Poverty in California” campaign for the governorship.

Kate Richards O’Hare raised her young family in the Shaw neighborhood. She spent those years firming her ideals and beliefs and left the community stronger than when she arrived.  I honor the spirit of Red Kate, who leaves a legacy to inspire subsequent generations of Shaw activists.


Timecapsule Thursday: Lester’s Music Building

So glad that Mrs. Lester fought to keep the building at 39th and Castleman – imagine what a thriving business district we might have had if more people had done the same!  The priority for destroying commercial and retail in favor of creating a ‘bedroom community’- like neighborhood in Shaw seems sadly shortsighted now.

23 May 1988 Lesters

23 May 1988 Post-Dispatch


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